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Southwest Airlines reports first quarterly profit in two years

By Rajesh Kumar Singh CHICAGO (Reuters) -Southwest Airlines Co on Thursday reported its first quarterly profit in two years, but

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Inside Biden's calculated silence on Breyer's retirement

President Joe Biden received a much-needed political opening on Wednesday. But neither he, nor anyone close to him, appeared ready to celebrate it.

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London-bound passengers face delays in Cape Town after BA door torn off

Hundreds of London-bound passengers were stranded in Cape Town after a passenger door was ripped off a British Airways jet heading for London. The Boeing 777 had just disembarked all on board the London to Cape Town 6000-mile flight when the incident happened on Wednesday morning. Airport ground crews tried to tow the £240m aircraft off the arrival stand to a parking area during routine towing but they had forgotten to unsecure the left-hand exit door. The door was completely torn out of the fuselage and left hanging off its hinges on the airport’s passenger bridge. No customers or crew were onboard at the time and there were no injuries. The Boeing, which carries 300 passengers, was due to return to the UK at 8.50pm on Wednesday but the flight home had to be cancelled. Hundreds of mainly British tourists returning to Heathrow were transferred to the later BA58. It took off two hours late for the 12-hour flight back home and they have now arrived at London Heathrow. A BA spokesman said: ”We have apologised to our customers for the slight delay to their departure from Cape Town due to an issue with the original aircraft. “Our customers continued safely on their way to London on an alternative service.” The 21-year-old plane, which is part of the BA fleet, is a twin engine jet and flies at 590mph and recently replaced retired Jumbo 747’s on the route. Read More Cape Town ‘records its hottest temperature’ amid South Africa heatwave Period changes after Covid jab are short-lived - study shows Statue of Kobe Bryant and daughter placed at helicopter crash site 2 years on

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Doctor saves life of football fan in stands for second time in three months

A doctor has been credited with helping to save the life of a football fan during a match for the second time in months. Doctor Tom Prichard works at North Tees Hospital A&E in Stockton and for Middlesbrough FC as the club's doctor. He and his colleagues Chris Moseley and Adam Reed were sprung into action on Monday evening when a fan collapsed in the stand during Middlesbrough's match with Blackburn Rovers. The trio was the first medical responders on the scene and was able to restart the elderly fan's breathing, helping to save his life. It is the second time in the space of three months that Dr Prichard has helped save a football fan's life at a match. In October, he attended to a fan who suffered a cardiac arrest during Middlesbrough's game with Newcastle at St James' Park. Dr Prichard and other medics gave the man life-saving treatment as the game was halted for a full 12 minutes before resuming. The supporter had regained consciousness before leaving the stadium and was taken to hospital where he was said to be in a stable condition. In a statement commenting on Dr Prichard's most recent heroics, Blackburn Rovers said: "Blackburn Rovers are pleased to report that the elderly gentleman who required urgent medical attention during tonight’s game is now in a stable condition in hospital. "The Rovers supporter, who was situated in the lower tier of the Jack Walker Stand, took ill midway through the second half of the 1-0 victory over Middlesbrough. "Rovers wish to pay a special thanks to Middlesbrough’s medical department, who were first on the scene and who were able to restart the gentleman’s breathing, as well as Rovers’ medical staff and the crowd doctor and his team for their swift response." The statement added: "After regaining consciousness, the supporter was taken by ambulance to hospital, where he is alert and stable. "Our thoughts remain with him and his family this evening, and we hope that he makes a full and speedy recovery. Read More Home Office admits unlawful secret policy to seize all Channel migrants’ phones Ministers are ‘cowards’ for not acting faster on air pollution says Labour MP Hospital cleaners take legal action over being paid less than white colleagues Home Office admits unlawful secret policy to seize all Channel migrants’ phones Ministers are ‘cowards’ for not acting faster on air pollution says Labour MP Hospital cleaners take legal action over being paid less than white colleagues

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Long-term US mortgage rates hold this week at 3.55%

Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates were essentially flat this week after jumping nearly a half percent the past two weeks in anticipation of the Federal Reserve announcement of pending rate increases

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Kristof tries to show that Oregon is home in governor's bid

Former New York Times journalist Nicholas Kristof traded the concrete canyons of Manhattan and the ritzy New York suburb of Scarsdale for his old family home, located on a dirt road in Oregon, to run for governor

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Christina Ricci got fired from babysitting job

Christina Ricci "almost" got the kids she was babysitting "arrested" after persuading them to help her egg the house of her rival.

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Prince Charles praises 'resilience' of Holocaust survivors

Prince Charles has praised the "extraordinary resilience and courage" of Britain's Holocaust survivors in the foreword to a new exhibition.

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Björn Ulvaeus insists ABBA remained 'professional' despite divorces

Björn Ulvaeus discusses the "professionalism" in ABBA during their infamous divorces and hints that there could be a stage sequel to jukebox musical 'Mamma Mia!'

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Jessica Szohr hopes she 'annoyed' fans with Gossip Girl character

'Gossip Girl' star Jessica Szohr hopes that fans "cringed" at her character Vanessa on the high school drama series.

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German parliament to vote on climate funds

BERLIN (Reuters) - Germany's lower house will on Thursday vote to suspend constitutional limits on new borrowing for another year

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Mali's junta tells France to keep 'colonial reflexes' to itself

By John Irish and Tiemoko Diallo PARIS/BAMAKO (Reuters) - France needs to stop interfering in Mali's affairs and keep its "colonial

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Northeast faces heavy snow and blizzard conditions this weekend, but how bad it will be still isn't clear

Heavy snow and strong winds are expected to slam some metro parts of the Northeast, where about 5 million people are planned to be under winter storm watches.

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Cashierless Amazon Go Stores Are Coming to the Suburbs

Amazon's cashierless convenience stores are moving to the 'burbs. The partially automated shops, primarily found

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Early data show January losses for stock picking hedge funds

(Reuters) - Hedge funds that specialize in picking stocks started 2022 with losses, investors and research firms said this week

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U.K. Insurer First Central Considering £600 Million Sale

(Bloomberg) -- British insurer First Central Group Ltd. is considering a sale that could value the business at about 600

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Italy again fails to elect president as parties buy time

The fourth round of Italy's presidential elections flopped before it began Thursday, with parties unwilling to risk a crisis by

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Textron sees higher corporate jet production, reports 4th quarter sales drop

(Reuters) -Textron Inc expects to continue ramping up business jet production in 2022 as wealthy travelers fly private, but broader

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Home Office admits unlawful secret policy to seize all Channel migrants’ phones

The Home Office has admitted exercising an unlawful and secret policy of seizing mobile phones from all migrants crossing the English Channel. Lawyers representing the home secretary made the admission at the High Court on Thursday, while fighting legal action brought by three asylum seekers. The men, from Iraq and Iran, were all arrested on arrival in the UK despite committing no crime, and were stripped of their possessions. British authorities kept their mobile phones for several months, leaving them unable to contact their loved ones, as one of the men feared his wife and seven-year-old daughter had been killed. The claimants are asking the High Court to make declarations of “serious illegality”, award damages and require the Home Office to alert everyone affected by the unlawful policy. Their lawyers estimate that hundreds or thousands of mobile phones may have been unlawfully seized dating back to 2018. Alan Payne QC told the High Court: “The home secretary is accepting that the seizure policies were unlawful, were not in accordance with the law for the purpose of the European Convention on Human Rights andi did not provide a lawful basis for the processing of data.” Mr Payne said a version of a mobile phone policy that has been scrapped was unlawful because it was “blanket and unpublished”. He also admitted that a separate policy to keep asylum seekers' phones for a minimum of three months was a “disproportionate interference” with human rights, and that the complete extraction of data from every phone violated the Data Protection Act. The Home Office also admits that a practice where asylum seekers were ordered to hand over their PIN numbers to allow immigration officers to access their phones was unlawful, as were the data protection impact assessments done at the time. The court heard that the “blanket seizure policy” operated at the Tug Haven reception unit in Dover between April and November 2020. Home Office lawyers said its “precise origins are not known” and the policy “appears to have developed organically”. Dir James Eadie QC, representing the home secretary, said there was a “misunderstanding permeating that an illegal entry offence was always committed by passengers” on small boat at the time. In December, the Court of Appeal ruled that crossing the Channel with the aim of being intercepted and claiming asylum did not amount to illegal entry, and that a “legal heresy” had developed among authorities and caused a series of wrongful prosecutions. Lord Justice Edis, who heard that case and the current challenge, said material received subsequently suggests “the origin of the error was actually in the Home Office and its agencies”. Read More Solution for tackling migrant crossings ‘not at sea’, MPs told Home Office loses case over stripping citizenship without notice Home Office refuses to equip immigration officers with bodycams despite IOPC advice Patel facing questions about why Liverpool bomber was allowed to stay in UK Pandemic-era design solution from the past: The Murphy bed Government could tighten controls on opioid 500 times stronger than morphine

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Qatar's top envoy visits Iran as Tehran and Washington consider direct nuclear talks

By Parisa Hafezi and Andrew Mills DUBAI (Reuters) - Qatar's top diplomat visited Iran on Thursday, Iranian state media reported,

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Goa Polls: Ex-CM Parrikar’s Son Files Nomination as Independent Candidate

Parrikar offered prayers at a temple on Thursday morning before filing his nomination papers from Panaji.

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Altria: iQOS cigarette alternative off market through 2022

Altria said Thursday that its heat-not-burn cigarette, iQOS, probably won’t be back in U.S. stores for at least a year

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CBSE Board Exams: Lack of Clarity Over Dates, Format Leaves Students Unsettled

Most teachers say that boards should only be held once offline pre-boards have taken place.

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Deutsche Telekom Weighs Tower Tie-Up With Vodafone, Orange

(Bloomberg) -- Deutsche Telekom AG is weighing a potential merger of its mobile towers with those of rivals including Vodafone

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