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Marcus Lamb's death highlights Christian media's vaccine problem

The media may not be paying enough attention to the influence of Christian broadcasters when it comes to Covid-19, CNN chief media correspondent Brian Stelter said on "Reliable Sources" Sunday.

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Trust in UK politicians hits all-time low in wake of sleaze scandal

The level of trust in UK politicians has plummeted to a historic low, according to a new survey that found that almost two-thirds of voters believe MPs are merely “out for themselves”. The poll found that 63 per cent share this view, with just 5 per cent saying they believe politicians are motivated primarily by the good of the country. In 2014, when David Cameron was prime minister, after the financial crash and MPs’ expenses scandal and several years into the Conservative Party’s ‘austerity’ period, just 48 per cent of voters believed politicians were “out merely for themselves” rather than for the good of their country or party. But by May this year, within two years of Boris Johnson taking office, this had risen to 57 per cent, and the figure now stands at 63 per cent in the wake of the Owen Paterson affair. The Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) think tank said that the “disturbing” findings suggest that the recent rash of sleaze scandals has taken a toll on public perception of the political class, and has “squandered” the boost in public confidence recorded amid massive state interventions during the Covid crisis. And the group’s director of research, Harry Quilter-Pinner, said the actions of the Johnson administration were “making things worse”. He warned that the collapse in trust threatens the effective functioning of the democratic system, particularly on issues like climate change, where voters must be persuaded that costly action now will deliver results many years in the future. In a report published yesterday, the IPPR suggested that changes to the selection process to deliver candidates from a wider range of backgrounds – including those who have not been to university – would be a good first step to rebuilding trust. The YouGov poll repeated a question first asked in 1944, when just over one in three British people (35 per cent) thought that politicians were only out for themselves, while slightly more said they were motivated to serve their country. That high level of trust in politicians’ selflessness came at a time when huge sacrifices were being demanded from ordinary people as the government undertook an unprecedented mobilisation of society to fight the Second World War. A follow-up poll in 1972 found eroded levels of trust, but the proportion who thought politicians were primarily “in it for themselves” was still below 40 per cent. The survey on which the new report is based found that trust in MPs falls the further away in England you travel from Westminster, with Burnley recording the lowest levels of confidence and London suburbs Hampstead and Kilburn the highest. And there is evidence that the aftermath of Brexit has altered the make-up of the groups who express distrust in the country’s leaders. Before the 2016 referendum, Leave backers and people with lower academic qualifications were more likely to be distrustful of politicians, but following the divisive vote, university-educated voters and supporters of EU membership are now most likely to think MPs are motivated by their own self-interest. In the report, the IPPR proposes four changes to enhance levels of trust by narrowing the gap between voters’ hopes and their real-life experiences: • Better public services, jobs and opportunities • Action to tackle the biggest issues in modern life • A bold programme of constitutional and democratic reform • Increased diversity of election candidates and greater direct involvement for citizens in democratic processes and decision making Mr Quilter-Pinner said: “Our research shows a significant and disturbing decline in public trust in politicians and democracy in the UK. More people than ever are convinced that MPs are primarily looking out for themselves, rather than their country. “Rather than taking bold action now to reverse this long-term trend, the government seem to be making things worse. “These trends are deeply concerning. In a political system where voters allow and rely on others to make decisions on their behalf, trust is the most valuable commodity. Without it, our democratic systems stop functioning effectively. “Our politicians must act now to set the UK on a new course, away from democratic dissatisfaction, towards a system which delivers on the priorities of citizens and where everyone has a say in how society is governed.” Read More Opposition in Kyrgyzstan challenges election results Inside the 'big wave' of misinformation targeted at Latinos Travel bans will do nothing to stop spread of omicron to UK, scientist warns Travel bans will do nothing to stop spread of omicron to UK, scientist warns Anger over ambulances may offer key to by-election upset, Liberal Democrats claim Commons speaker goes to police over claims of cocaine use at Westminster

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Russia beat Croatia to win third Davis Cup

Russia claimed a third Davis Cup title on Sunday after Daniil Medvedev and Andrey Rublev both won their singles matches

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Leicester 16-14 Harlequins: George Ford helps maintain unbeaten start

George Ford helped Leicester maintain their unbeaten start to the Gallagher Premiership season by kicking eleven points against Harlequins on Sunday. The England fly-half kicked three penalties and converted a try from Harry Potter, taking the Tigers’ winning run to nine games. Louis Lynagh scored Harlequins’ try with Marcus Smith kicking three penalties but Smith and Danny Care were outpointed in the key half-back duel with the experienced Ford and Ben Youngs. Leicester prop Dan Cole celebrated his 200th Premiership appearance before a sell-out crowd of 24,202 at Mattioli Woods Welford Road and his side were soon ahead when Ford knocked over a simple penalty. Smith responded with one for Quins but Ben Youngs brought the home crowd to its feet with a superb 40-metre break which took him close to the try-line - but Tigers were unable to capitalise as Ford failed to find Hanro Liebenberg with his cross-field kick. A second penalty from Smith put the visitors 6-3 in front at the end of the first quarter, which Leicester had largely controlled, but they could not take advantage of some powerful carries from Ellis Genge and Nemani Nadolo. Youngs was the star of the opening exchanges as he made another sizzling break to leave Alex Dombrandt in his wake, but desperate defence from Quins kept the scrum-half out. Leicester turned down a couple of kickable penalties and were narrowly denied when Freddie Steward was forced into touch inches short by the combined efforts of Tyrone Green and Cadan Murley. Ford brought the scores level with his second success before Smith was yellow-carded for knocking the ball from Youngs’ hands, with Ford kicking the resulting penalty. Leicester number eight Jasper Wiese then followed Smith to the sin-bin for a no-arms tackle and the visitors should have made then pay but Huw Jones, on his first Premiership start, inexplicably went for glory when there was a clear overlap outside him. A golden opportunity was lost so Tigers held on for a 9-6 interval lead. Three minutes after the restart, Tigers scored the first try when Ford and Youngs neatly combined before Potter collected the scrum-half’s kick ahead to score. Smith and Wiese both returned from the bin before Smith kept Quins in contention with his third penalty. The outstanding Youngs was replaced by Richard Wigglesworth with 25 minutes remaining and it was in time to see Lynagh score a splendid solo try by skilfully kicking ahead and winning the race to touch down. Smith’s touchline conversion crucially went wide so Leicester held a two-point advantage going into the final 15 minutes. Ford was then presented with his most difficult kick of the afternoon and although he was off target from 45 metres on an angle, his side held on for a deserved victory. Additional reporting from PA Read More Daly to make Saracens return in Exeter clash after four months out Saracens beat Sale to climb to second in Premiership Harlequins 19-22 London Irish: Exiles stun Quins at the Stoop

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Biden ran on bringing people together. He's failed so far

President Joe Biden ran on a campaign of bringing people together. But nearly a year into his administration, Biden has been overwhelmed by the long-term trend of polarization.

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US sees long queues in vaccination centres following Omicron scare: Report

The report pointed out that the demand for vaccines grew from an average of under-a-million doses a day to an average of 1.5 million a day in recent weeks, citing data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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125 pedestrian signals to be installed across Pune city

With a plan to improve pedestrian safety, and therefore walkability, the Pune Municipal Corporation (PMC) has allocated a budget to install 125 pedestrian signals at various chowks in the city

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Delhi: Sub-inspector claims station chief sought bribe for posting

A photo of the sub-inspector’s notes on the general diary was widely circulated on social media groups on Sunday

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Resident doctors of several Delhi hospitals to boycott all services from Monday over counselling delay

The Federation of Resident Doctors' Association said they would withdraw from all services, routine as well emergency, in healthcare institutions from December 6 to intensify their stir.

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Robert Dole, Senate GOP Leader and White House Hopeful, Dies

(Bloomberg) -- Bob Dole, the World War II veteran who recovered from near-fatal wounds to become the U.S. Senate Republican

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Anger over ambulances may offer key to surprise by-election win, Liberal Democrats claim

Liberal Democrats believe that local anger over underperforming ambulance services may give them an opportunity to win a surprise victory in next week’s North Shropshire by-election to match their shock capture of Chesham and Amersham with a 25-point swing earlier this year. The rural seat has been solidly Conservative since its creation in 1983 and is up for grabs after Owen Paterson resigned over sleaze allegations. The Lib Dems were a distant third in 2019, but internal party polling seen by The Independent has given strategists hope that they could be within reach of another breakthrough. They claim that Boris Johnson’s campaign visit to the constituency on Friday was an indication that the prime minister is “scared of an upset” and said that the loss of the stronghold seat would provoke a “political earthquake” in Downing Street. Canvassing returns show Lib Dems in a better position among postal voters than at the same point in the Chesham and Amersham campaign, with the gap closing by seven points in the last week alone, they said. Along with dissatisfaction over the former Tory MP’s involvement in the sleaze scandal – and Mr Johnson’s botched attempt to save him – Ed Davey’s party believes that disgruntlement over the government’s handling of the NHS may turn North Shropshire voters away from the Conservatives ahead of the 16 December ballot. Shropshire’s council was recently told that the county “ran out” of ambulances at one point last month because all of the emergency vehicles were queuing outside hospitals. And all four of the county’s community ambulance stations – including Oswestry and Market Drayton in North Shropshire – were closed in October as the West Midlands Ambulance Service concentrated facilities in Shrewsbury and Telford. National polling conducted for the Lib Dems showed that pressure on ambulance services is more likely to make prospective Tory voters think negatively about the current administration than other NHS-related issues. The survey by Savanta ComRes found that, when asked which of four issues were most likely to turn them against the Tories, 32 per cent of those who backed the Conservatives in 2019 chose problems with the ambulance service. Meanwhile, 21 per cent opted for difficulties getting same-day GP appointments, 20 per cent said the closure of rural hospitals and 10 per cent said GP numbers. The Lib Dems also revealed that all 10 regional NHS ambulance services in England are at the highest level of alert, meaning they are facing “extreme pressure”. NHS figures showed that waiting times reached a record high in October, with heart attack and stroke victims facing average delays of 55 minutes for an ambulance to turn up. The party’s health spokesperson Daisy Cooper has proposed a new law to require the government to publish more localised data on ambulance waiting times to help local communities hold ministers to account. Ms Cooper told The Independent: “Boris Johnson’s government is running local health services into the ground and former Conservative voters in rural areas like North Shropshire feel taken for granted and outright ignored. “Record-long ambulance waits are leaving vulnerable patients stuck in queues outside hospitals for hours without the treatment they need. People are being left scared, panicked and with worsening symptoms, and in extreme cases dying when they might have been saved. She added: “This by-election is a chance for people in North Shropshire to send a powerful message to Boris Johnson’s Conservatives that their concerns about overstretched local health services can’t be ignored any longer. “A victory for the Liberal Democrat candidate Helen Morgan would cause a political earthquake in the heart of Downing Street.” Mr Paterson held North Shropshire with an overwhelming 63 per cent of the vote in 2019, with Labour on 22 per cent and the Lib Dems just 10. NHS surgeon Neil Shastri-Hurst is standing for the Conservatives in this month’s by-election, along with Labour’s Ben Wood and candidates for Reform UK, Ukip, the Greens and a string of smaller parties. Read More Commons speaker goes to police over Westminster cocaine use claims - follow live Boris Johnson gets Tory candidate’s name wrong during by-election visit Tory MP registers new £60,000-a-year role for his consultancy business People have a ‘right’ to elect racists and misogynists, says Tory MP Voters go to the polls in Old Bexley and Sidcup by-election Tory MPs give up advisory roles in wake of row over second jobs

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Bob Dole, giant of the Senate and 1996 Republican presidential nominee, dies

Bob Dole, a Republican Party stalwart and presidential hopeful who espoused a brand of plain-spoken conservativism as one of Washington's most recognizable political figures throughout the latter half of the 20th century, died Sunday.

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Panthers part ways with OC Joe Brady

The Carolina Panthers fired offensive coordinator Joe Brady on Sunday with five games remaining in his second season with the

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Saudi Arabian Grand Prix LIVE: Max Verstappen leads Lewis Hamilton after red flags in chaotic F1 race

Lewis Hamilton claimed a crucial pole position for this evening’s Saudi Arabian Grand Prix ahead of Max Verstappen as the F1 title race took another twist. The Red Bull driver was poised to leapfrog his Mercedes rival before a stunning crash confirmed the seven-time word champion at the front of the grid in what promises to be a historic race in Jeddah. Now the Briton, who admitted his pride at gaining an edge over his title rival in qualification, hopes to maintain his advantage and either close the Belgian-Dutch driver’s eight-point lead or eliminate it entirely should he also seize the bonus point for the fastest lap. It promises to be a race packed with thrills and spills as the Formula 1 season arrives at its penultimate race before the finale in Abu Dhabi. It is imperative that Hamilton wins here, with Verstappen able to move towards the brink of title glory with a win, as it would stretch his lead enough that only significant trouble could prevent him from winning even if the Mercedes star wins the final race in Abu Dhabi. And after what was a rare mistake from Verstappen in a dramatic qualifying session, he admitted: “Of course it’s terrible. It was a good qualifying. I knew the pace was there, I don’t really understand what happened but I locked up, clipped the wall and had to stop. P3 is a bit disappointing but the car is quick and let’s see what we can do in the race.” Follow live race updates from Jeddah, reaction and analysis as the F1 season rumbles on: Read More Saudi Arabia Grand Prix live stream: How to watch Formula 1 race online and on TV Rollercoaster Formula 1 season set for fitting finale Lewis Hamilton ‘proud’ to have the edge ahead of Saudi Arabian Grand Prix Christian Horner slams F1 ‘inconsistency’ after Lewis Hamilton escapes penalty at Saudi Arabia Grand Prix

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Saudi Wealth Fund to Raise Up to $3.1 Billion in STC Sale

(Bloomberg) -- Saudi Arabia’s sovereign wealth fund is set to raise as much as $3.1 billion through the sale of

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10 Covid-19 cases identified on New Orleans-bound cruise ship

Ten cases of Covid-19 were identified on a Norwegian Cruise Line ship that disembarked in New Orleans on Sunday, the city said.

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Bob Dole, war hero, longtime senator, presidential candidate, dies at 98

By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Bob Dole, who overcame grievous World War Two combat wounds to become a pre-eminent

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AP News Digest 2 p.m.

Here are the AP’s latest coverage plans, top stories and promotable content. All times EST. For up-to-the minute information on AP’s coverage, visit Coverage Plan at https://newsroom.ap.org.

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Uganda launches road-building in Congo to boost trade

By Elias Biryabarema KAMPALA (Reuters) - Uganda said on Sunday it had launched a road-building project in neighbouring Democratic Republic

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Freiburg pile pressure on Huetter with 'surreal' win in Moenchengladbach

Borussia Moenchengladbach coach Adi Huetter was under mounting pressure Sunday after his side slumped to a historic 6-0 humiliation at

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Aston Villa outclass Leicester as Steven Gerrard outwits his former coach Brendan Rodgers

The good news for Leicester City is that a controversial moment in the game helped mask the extent of their defensive deficiencies. The bad news is Aston Villa still pierced them twice, extending the visitors’ malaise to 14 league games without a clean sheet and just three victories in their last 12. Steven Gerrard outwitted his former Liverpool manager and ex-Old Firm foe to intensify pressure on Brendan Rodgers, who has not witnessed his side be this inconsistent; starved of compactness and control. Villa manoeuvred above Leicester in the standings to further a fine start under their new boss. But for wastefulness, a Michael Oliver decision assisted by VAR, and a clumsily worded law, the scoreline could have been inflated in their favour. A highly entertaining game that saw two teams more intent on and comfortable in flexing their offensive weaponry was level heading into the interval. Excellent movement, persistence and intelligence from Patson Daka created the opener. He thieved possession off Marvelous Nakamba and supplied a slick angled pass to Harvey Barnes. Ezri Konsa tried to impede him but was nutmegged for his trouble with the ball nestling into the far corner. A set-piece, Leicester’s kryptonite, sparked a spate of aerial tennis with Emi Buendia heading in from 12 yards and the ball ultimately helped in by the studs of Konsa’s boot. Only three minutes separated the goals, and with the tempo quite relentless, it was unsurprising that both teams continued to threaten. Kasper Schmeichel thwarted Matty Cash, who in turn spoiled a James Maddison strike. The divisive moment of the match arrived soon after when Douglas Luiz delivered a cross beyond the far post, which Cash headed back into the six-yard box. Schmeichel dived to his right trying to palm the ball away, but could only get a loose left hand on it for half a second before Jacob Ramsey slammed it in. The goal was given before Oliver was advised to review the incident on the monitor, with the effort chalked off. Law 12 was invoked, which reads the goalkeeper is in control if “the ball is between the hands or between the hand and any surface (e.g. ground, own body) or by touching it with any part of the hands or arms except if the ball rebounds from the goalkeeper or the goalkeeper has made a save”. The exception seemed to clarify that the goal should have stood, given it was a rebound from Schmeichel. However, it possibly could only apply to the final clause – a case of poor wording. That denial ignited Villa, who began the second period strongly and were suitably rewarded. Luke Thomas blocked from Ollie Watkins, but the resulting corner saw Konsa effortlessly rise above Caglar Soyuncu to nail a downward header in at the near post. Leicester’s deadball defect continued, conceding a joint league-high 10 goals from set-pieces this season. Maddison had a lovely left-footed shot that skimmed just wide, but the closing stages were largely a story of Villa spurning opportunities on the break. Gerrard has now overseen three wins from four, with the black mark a credible defeat by title-eyeing Manchester City. Conquering Anfield represents his next challenge; an emotive equation. The math is altogether more difficult for Rodgers, who has to solve a variety of issues for a Leicester side that feel like an imitation of recent history. Read More Giovanni van Bronckhorst pleased with Rangers desire as winning run continues Giovanni van Bronckhorst’s winning start continues as Rangers see off Dundee Steven Gerrard backs Ollie Watkins to earn England recall Villa face Leicester as frayed Gerrard-Rodgers relationship rekindled Steven Gerrard speaks of respect for Brendan Rodgers ahead of latest meeting Rangnick gets going and Howe hunts a vital win – Premier League talking points

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Far-right French presidential hopeful promises 'reconquest' at rally

By Antony Paone and Leigh Thomas VILLEPINTE, France (Reuters) - French far-right presidential candidate Eric Zemmour promised on Sunday a

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Commons speaker goes to police over claims of cocaine use at Westminster

Commons speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle has said he will call in police over “deeply concerning” allegations of drug use in the Palace of Westminster. In a warning to anyone bringing cocaine or other illegal substances into parliament, the speaker said he was treating the matter as a priority and wanted to see “full and effective enforcement of the law” with serious sanctions for those flouting the rules. Sir Lindsay’s move comes after The Sunday Times reported that an investigation found evidence of cocaine in 11 out of 12 locations tested in the building. One senior MP said it was time to consider bringing in sniffer dogs to detect illicit substances. The speaker said: “The accounts of drug misuse in Parliament given to the Sunday Times are deeply concerning - and I will be raising them as a priority with the Metropolitan Police next week. “I expect to see full and effective enforcement of the law.” Sir Lindsay added: “While parliament provides extensive support services for any staff or members who may need help with drug misuse - and I would encourage anyone struggling with such issues to take up such help – for those who choose to flout the law and bring the institution into disrepute the sanctions are serious.” The Sunday Times reported that commons officials had received reports last month that cannabis could be smelt in an open space – often used by staff for cigarette breaks – between two parliamentary buildings housing MPs’ offices and committee rooms. Cocaine detection wipe tests carried out in a single evening on 12 locations in parliament found evidence of the class A substance in lavatories near the offices of prime minster Boris Johnson and home secretary Priti Patel, as well other washrooms, the paper said. The newspaper quoted anonymous Westminster sources claiming that drug use was rife among some staff and MPs. One was quoted as saying: “I have seen an MP openly snorting cocaine at a party. There were journalists present and I warned them that what they were doing was extremely dangerous and they could be exposed but they seemed to get off on the power trip.” Another said: “MPs tend to be more careful than staff and will go back to their office to do it rather than doing it in any of the public spaces, but I have heard of one staffer who walked in on their MP doing a late-night line at their desk.” One Westminster veteran told the paper: “There is a cocaine culture in parliament. Some people are at it all the time and are totally blasé. Others dabble. Some are household names, some are ambitious young MPs and officials, but all of them risk throwing away their careers. They think they are untouchable, protected by their friends in the bubble. It’s shocking but also sad. Lots of them need help.” Sir Lindsay raised concerns about the scale of drug use at Westminster during his campaign to succeed John Bercow as speaker in 2019, telling MPs: “It’s not just drink we’ve got to catch out, there is a drug problem.” Since then, figures released by the Metropolitan Police under freedom of information laws have shown that there were 17 drug crimes detected in or near the parliamentary buildings in the past year. Police investigated 38 drug offences on the estate between 2015 and 2018. Conservative MP Charles Walker, who chairs the administration committee, said that the issue would be discussed by the House of Commons Commission next week and sniffer dogs could be brought in. “The House of Commons has a long history of using sniffer dogs to detect explosives,” he said. “It may be that we now need to broaden the range of sniffer dogs ... to include those which can detect drugs.” The issue has blown up as Mr Johnson steps up action against drugs, warning middle-class cocaine users they could have their passports or driving licences confiscated if fines prove no deterrent. He is also expected in the coming week to announce a new clampdown on county lines drug operations moving crack and heroin from England and Wales’s cities into every area of the country. Jenny Symmons, who chairs the GMB union branch for parliamentary staff, said: “Parliament is a microcosm of the country so of course drugs will be a problem, but the working culture of late nights and short deadlines can create a pressure that feels unmanageable. Support must be available for those who have turned to drugs and we must continue to improve working conditions for staff.” Jacob Rees-Mogg, the commons leader, said: “The Palace of Westminster ought to be the bastion of lawfulness. There are a lot of police on the parliamentary estate who should enforce the law using all the tools at their disposal to stop drug dealing and drug abuse within the palace.” Read More Homes endure ‘exhausting’ fifth day without power in the wake of Storm Arwen Should MPs be allowed to take their children into the Commons? Tell us in our poll Rules around babies in parliament to be reviewed after Stella Creasy reprimanded Travel bans will do nothing to stop spread of omicron to UK, scientist warns Trust in UK politicians hits all-time low in wake of sleaze scandal Anger over ambulances may offer key to by-election upset, Liberal Democrats claim

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Factbox-Legal cases against Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi

(Reuters) - Myanmar's former leader Aung San Suu Kyi was due on Monday to hear the first verdicts in her

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New-manager bounce in full flow at Man United, Spurs, Villa

Ralf Rangnick has started his tenure as Manchester United manager with a 1-0 win over Crystal Palace in the Premier League thanks to a rare goal from Fred at Old Trafford

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