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Apple takes us for a walk with Ayọ Tometi, one of the founders of Black Lives Matter

This Black History Month, Apple is encouraging you to go for a walk with activist

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Google Pay Cryptocurrency Move: Platform may enter Bitcoin, Ethereum space

In a new development, Google Pay’s crypto move might see them bring Bitcoin, Ethereum and other cryptocurrencies to its platform

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Puerto Rico Updated Fiscal Plan Pushes Out Deficits to 2048

(Bloomberg) -- Sign up for the New Economy Daily newsletter, follow us @economics and subscribe to our podcast. Puerto Rico

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Amyra Dastur is samba bar fashion inspo in r₹r5k strappy floral dress

Amyra Dastur flaunts a flattering silhouette in an eye-catching floral print slip-on ankle-grazing dress, worth ₹5,590, and we can't stop swooning as she lays fashion inspo to head straight to a samba bar | Check viral pictures inside

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Ameesha Patel addresses feud rumours with Kareena Kapoor, reveals what she said when asked about working together

Actor Ameesha Patel has addressed rumours of her feud with Kareena Kapoor, adding that she even asked her to star in a film together.

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Javed Akhtar reacts to row over Netaji's statue at India Gate: ‘Idea is fine, choice of statue is not right’

PM Narendra Modi announced recently that a statue of Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose will be installed at India Gate. Lyricist Javed Akhtar has criticised the choice of the statue and has said “it is not right.”

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‘Total rhubarb’: Boris Johnson repeats denial that he ordered Afghan animal airlift

Boris Johnson has dismissed new evidence that he ordered the controversial evacuation of dogs and cats from Afghanistan as “total rhubarb”. Internal emails released to the public this week show officials saying the prime minister has “authorised” resources be directed to getting the animals out of the country. The email contradicted Mr Johnson’s previous claims he had ordered the evacuation. He had branded the claims “complete nonsense” and said it would have been wrong for him to have intervened. But despite the new evidence the PM doubled down on Thursday when asked about the episode, telling reporters: “No, that is… this whole thing is total rhubarb.” On a visit to North Wales the prime minister said he was “very proud of what our armed services did with Operation Pitting” and that “it was an amazing thing to move 15,000 people out of Kabul in the way that we did”. Mr Johnson added: “I thought it was also additionally very good that we were able to help those vets who came out as well. But I can tell you that the military always prioritised human beings and that was quite right.” The 173 cats and dogs were being looked after by the charity Nowzad, which was set up by former Royal Marine Pen Farthing. Whistleblowers and MPs criticised the animal airlift on the grounds that it drew on finite capacity at Kabul airport that could have been used to rescue people. Emails provided to the Commons Foreign Affairs Committee show that one Foreign Office official told colleagues working on the evacuation on August 25 that “the PM has just authorised their staff and animals to be evacuated”. Further evidence of Mr Johnson's involvement includes a report by Sky News that Trudy Harrison, Mr Johnson's parliamentary private secretary, contacted a private charter company to secure a plane for the evacuation of the animals and staff. A source at the company was reported as saying Ms Harrison was keen to get press on the plane in order to make the evacuation a good news story. They said she kept talking about "the boss" and that it felt obvious her request came with his backing. Ms Harrison admitted to the broadcaster she told staff of her role working with the prime minister, but insisted he was not involved in any evacuation plans. Mr Farthing’s friend Dom Dyer, who help campaign to get the animals evacuated, also told the BBC on Thursday: “There’s no question that the prime minister was involved, had oversight, had an interest”. Mr Dyer said he been in touch with MP Ms Harrison. He said she “was definitely keeping the prime minister in the loop through the processes we were doing”. Though the charity chartered its own plane and put the animals in the hold, civil servants and MPs with knowledge of the operation on the ground said the capacity constraint at the airport was a limited number of soldiers able to escort people into the airport. In December, whistle-blower Raphael Marshall told MPs that the Foreign Office received “an instruction from the prime minister” to use “considerable capacity” to help Farthing. At the time, Foreign Affairs Select Committee chair Tom Tugendhat, himself a veteran of the war in Afghanistan, also criticised the decision to airlift the dogs and cats. “There’s quite a lot of space on the aeroplanes, they’re coming and going relatively easily,” he had told LBC radio. “The difficulty is getting people into and out of the airport and we’ve just used a lot of troops to get in 200 dogs, meanwhile my interpreter’s family are likely to be killed.” Read More Johnson’s wait continues for partygate report which could be key to his future Boris Johnson fuels speculation that National Insurance rise may be ditched Johnson says suggestion he intervened in animal airlift is ‘total rhubarb’ Boris Johnson wouldn’t have to resign if interviewed by police, says Jacob Rees-Mogg Jacob Rees-Mogg dismisses Afghan airlift row as ‘fussing about a few animals’ Sue Gray report unlikely to be published today as Boris Johnson makes visit to Wales

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Robot performs surgery without help from humans

A robot has operated on a pig without human help. The machine successfully performed keyhole surgery on a pig, attaching organs in a range of different animals. And it did so without the help of a human, for the first time. Scientists hope that it can help bring about fully automated operations on humans by similar robotic systems. The Smart Tissue Autonomous Robot (Star) carried out the delicate keyhole - laparoscopic - surgery, which involved connecting two ends of an intestine, in four animals. According to the study, the robot excelled at the procedure which requires a high level of precision and repetitive movements. Senior author, Dr Axel Krieger from Johns Hopkins University, said the procedure marked the first time a robot had performed a laparoscopic surgery without human help. Connecting two ends of an intestine is arguably the most challenging step in gastrointestinal surgery, requiring a surgeon to apply stitches - or sutures - with high accuracy and consistency, experts say. The slightest hand tremor or misplaced stitch can result in a leak that could have catastrophic complications for the patient. Dr Krieger, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Johns Hopkins’ Whiting School of Engineering, said: “Our findings show that we can automate one of the most intricate and delicate tasks in surgery: the reconnection of two ends of an intestine. “The Star performed the procedure in four animals and it produced significantly better results than humans performing the same procedure.” He helped create the robot, a vision-guided system designed specifically to suture soft tissue, with colleagues at the Children’s National Hospital in Washington DC and Jin Kang. Dr Krieger is a Johns Hopkins professor of electrical and computer engineering. The current version improves a 2016 model that repaired a pig’s intestines, but required a large incision to access the intestine and more guidance from humans. Expert say the new features allow for improved surgical precision, including specialised suturing tools and imaging systems that provide more accurate visualisations of the surgical field. It is especially hard for robots to perform soft-tissue surgery because of how unpredictable it is, forcing them to be able to adapt quickly to handle unexpected obstacles. The study sets out a novel control system in the Star that can adjust the surgical plan in real time, just as a human surgeon would. Dr Krieger said: “What makes the Star special is that it is the first robotic system to plan, adapt, and execute a surgical plan in soft tissue with minimal human intervention.” He added: “Robotic anastomosis (surgically joining two structures) is one way to ensure that surgical tasks that require high precision and repeatability can be performed with more accuracy and precision in every patient independent of surgeon skill. “We hypothesise that this will result in a democratised surgical approach to patient care with more predictable and consistent patient outcomes.” The findings are published in Science Robotics. Additional reporting by Press Association Read More Supersonic airliner gets $60m funding from US military Elon Musk says Tesla’s ‘Optimus’ robot could one day outsell its cars Bitcoin price rebounds as Putin shows interest in crypto Supersonic airliner gets $60m funding from US military Elon Musk says Tesla’s ‘Optimus’ robot could one day outsell its cars Bitcoin price rebounds as Putin shows interest in crypto

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Burkina Faso Coup: Military strongmen dey return to West Africa?

West African na largely democratic region but yet three kontris, Mali, Guinea and Burkina Faso, dey under military rule.

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Kosovo's first female Winter Olympian aims for glory in China

Young, determined and willing to take chances, slalom skier Kiana Kryeziu's journey to the Olympics mirrors the recent history of

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Christian Pulisic finding it ‘tough’ to meet Chelsea demands while being played out of position

Christian Pulisic has admitted to recently finding it tough at Chelsea, due to being played out of position. Thomas Tuchel has struggled to get his attackers firing in either his favoured 3-4-2-1 formation or in the occassionally-tested 4-3-3. For the American, that has meant moving around the pitch and even popping up at wing-back and as a false nine. That has contributed to a return of just three goals this season, and Pulisic has discussed his situation ahead of two crucial World Cup qualifiers with the United States national team. “It is tough,” he told reporters. “I haven’t always been playing in the positions I want to play in. “But I think it is a good quality to be versatile and able to play in all kinds of positions and have different strengths on the pitch. I’ve learned a lot and I’m ready to hopefully be in a spot over the next few games that I’m more comfortable in.” El Salvador and group leaders Canada are up next for the USMNT, who are looking good to qualify for Qatar 2022, with the Club World Cup on the horizon for Chelsea. “I would say there’s two sides to me, especially when people ask you how you are,” Pulisic added. “There is the soccer side and the person side. The person side is even more important to me and I’m doing alright in that sense. It is a lot sometimes. “When I come to the national team it is, ‘How are things with Chelsea?’ and ‘What’s this’ and ‘What’s that.’ It’s tough. Mentally it has played on me at times but I am always very excited to be on the national team and get to enjoy playing with these guys and just enjoy football in general.” Read More Inside Thomas Tuchel’s Chelsea transfer plans to bridge gap to Liverpool and Man City in title race Tottenham and Chelsea losing more than £150,000 per game due to unsold tickets, new study reveals

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Chile Peso Extends World-Beating Rally After Bold Rate Hike

(Bloomberg) -- Sign up for the New Economy Daily newsletter, follow us @economics and subscribe to our podcast. Chile’s peso

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PM Modi hosts first India-Central Asia Summit, outlines 3 goals

This is the first engagement of its kind between India and the Central Asian countries at the level of leaders.

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Elderly Jewish bakers suffer ‘vicious’ anti-Semitic attack on the night before Holocaust Memorial Day

A man launched into a “vicious” anti-Semitic assault on two Jewish men as they closed their bakers in Stamford Hill on the night before Holocaust Memorial Day. Two men, one on a mobile phone, were locking the premises on Cadoxton Ave when they were confronted by a man dressed in black covering his face with a snood. CCTV appears to show the suspect say something as he walks past before suddenly throwing a bottle at them and raining blows on one elderly man’s head. The man vainly holds up his keys to protect himself but is knocked to the ground with a single blow, his skullcap sent flying off his head. The attacker then goes after the other man who backs away but is thrown into a fence where the attack continues. The suspect then calmly walks away from the scene at 10pm on Wednesday. The two men were taken to hospital. Shomrim, a local volunteer police force, said one victim sustained a broken nose and fractured wrist in the attack. The other man suffered bruising and injuries to his eye and wrist. Police said they had arrested an 18-year-old man on suspicion of actual bodily harm. He remains in custody. Shomrim said they tracked the suspect using CCTV and helped Metropolitan Police make an arrest. The force released the footage on Twitter, adding: “The brutal, unprovoked attack saw the victims knocked to the floor by vicious punches to the head”. Local paramedics Hatzola added: “Earlier tonight Hatzola provided medical care and transported to hospital 2 victims following a vicious attack outside a bakery in Tottenham.” Scotland Yard confirmed they had one man in custody and were treating the attack as a hate crime. On Thursday morning Nazi and SS stickers were found by The Standard next to the bakery. A worker at So Real bakery said: “I have spoken to them. I think they’ve had some injuries to their face and some scans at hospital but are home now. “I didn’t even realise it was Holocaust Memorial Day it’s a shame - the world doesn’t change.” Home Secretary Priti Patel, tweeted: “An absolutely despicable attack. This, on the eve of Holocaust Memorial Day, is a sickening reminder of why we must never allow antisemitism to take root. “We won’t tolerate abuse towards our Jewish community. Thank you to the officers who responded swiftly to make an arrest.” Chief Supt Simon Crick said he wouldn’t stand for anyone in the community to be “targeted or hurt”. He said: “On this most important day, this is an awful reminder that hate crime still exists. “I would like to thank the members of the public who called us and asked us to come to the aid of these two gentleman, and grateful for their help which meant we could locate a suspect.” Read More Warning over highly infectious bug mainly affecting gay and bisexual men Brave Londoner fights off masked knifeman with a broom handle ‘Spineless’ robber blackmailed gay men he met on Grindr

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Ray J trolled for visiting Trump at Mar-a-Lago to discuss 'Black empowerment'

Ray J recently paid a visit to Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida to discuss 'Business, Technology, and Black Empowerment'

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YouTube Introduces Black Voices Creator Class of 2022

From musicians and lawyers to gamers and yogis, YouTube's Black Voices Creator Class of 2022

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U.S. economy regained speed in Q4, 2021 growth best since 1984

By Lucia Mutikani WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. economic growth accelerated in the fourth quarter as businesses replenished depleted inventories to

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JPMorgan Executives Ousted in a $200 Million Probe Land New Jobs

(Bloomberg) -- Wall Streeters shuddered as the news broke last year that U.S. regulators were examining whether bank employees were

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City braces for run of interest rate rises -- starting next week

What is going to happen to interest rates? As of today, Thursday, is seems highly likely they will rise next week and perhaps three more times this year. The Bank of England put rates up in December from 0.1% to 0.25%. The City thinks they will go to 0.5% at the Monetary Policy Committee meeting on Thursday. Then from there to 1.25%, in stages. Isn’t that going to be bad for the economy? The Bank hopes that gradual increases will give businesses and households time to plan. Interest rates have been awfully low for a very long time because we have been in one crisis or another. Them moving back to something approaching normal is a sign that we are recovering. Pre the financial crash “normal” rates were about 5%. We might now see the new normal at around 2%, which still leaves borrowing costs historically very cheap. If you are a saver – there are more of them than there are borrowers – you should start to see your interest payments go up. Most mortgage holders are on fixed rate deals so they are fine until those deals come to an end. New fixed rate deals will be a bit more expensive than the old ones. Still, a shock to some? According to AJ Bell there are 10 million Britons who have never seen rates above 1% in their adult lives. Laith Khalaf, head of investment analysis at AJ Bell, says: “A rate rise at the Bank’s February meeting is all but inked in, which if realised would be the first time since 2004 that the bank has raised interest rates in two consecutive meetings. Market pricing suggests a further three hikes this year, taking base rate to 1.25% by the end of 2022, which would be its highest level since February 2009, just before an ‘emergency’ rate of 0.5% and QE were introduced.” Why now? The Bank and the US Federal Reserve are worried about inflation. Last night Fed chief Jay Powell signalled he is likely to move aggressively on rates in the near future. Nathan Sheets, global chief economist at Citigroup, said: “Powell essentially said to the markets and the economy, ‘put on your seatbelt, we are getting ready to take off. If inflation doesn’t fall as they expect, the Fed is prepared to be vigorous.” Whether the Bank moving rates up will be enough to slow inflation is open to question. Many of the things driving up costs – supply chains, global energy costs – are beyond the Bank’s influence. For whom are higher rates good? Savers. Banks make more profit as margins rise. Bond investors should see yields rise (though prices will fall). Nationwide Building Society said today it will boost rates on a range of savings accounts by at least 0.15 percentage points. Nationwide Building Society’s savings shake-up from February 1 will include rate rises on children’s and regular savings accounts, the society’s Help to Buy Isa, as well as its loyalty accounts. And for whom bad? Higher rates might be bad for the stock market if investors move into bonds and out of equities, but some say the market is overvalued anyway. Khalaf again: “Higher base rate will mean the Exchequer needs to pay significantly more interest on the £875 billion of gilts held in the QE scheme, and that could have significant implications for the viability of any largesse the Chancellor might like to indulge in at the March Budget.” About a third of the interest paid on gilts goes back to the Bank however. It’s not that bad. If inflation and borrowing costs keep rising, my employer will simply have to give me a proper pay rise, right? Yes. You’ll quit otherwise. Read More How will inflation, politics and Covid impact your ability to buy in 2022? Revealed: new high for London house prices as living costs set to rise How the Bank of England missed the inflation curve

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SP Announces Names of 56 Candidates in 3rd List for UP Assembly Polls

Among the most prominent faces in the list are BSP turncoats Ram Achal Rajbhar and Lalji Verma.

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Omicron Now Dominant in India, Sub-Variant 'BA.2' More Prevalent: Government

The Centre also indicated that COVID-19 infections were showing early signs of decline in the country.

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'Totally Delighted': Chairman After Tata Group's Official Takeover of Air India

Meanwhile, Air India took to Twitter to welcome the Tata Group aboard.

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Indian Hockey Legend Charanjit Singh No More

Charanjit Singh was the Indian captain in 1964 Tokyo Olymics when the men's team won the Gold medal.

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WhatsApp has until end of Feb to clarify privacy policy change, EU says

By Foo Yun Chee BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Facebook unit WhatsApp has been given until the end of February to explain

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How to score points in the credit game

Getting and maintaining good credit can feel like a long, hard journey

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